Report: Satire Is Great, As Long As It Never Targets Any Of My Own Beliefs

TAMPA, FL—Insisting that only the opinions of others need to be examined, Amy Maxwell, 44, reported Thursday that satire is great, as long it never targets any of her own beliefs.

“I love satire; it’s as old as time and a much-needed social commentary—just think of A Modest Proposal, for example—but it has to be done just right,” Maxwell explained to reporters. “The way to really nail it is to critique only opinions and viewpoints that are not my own personal opinions and viewpoints, but those belonging to other people.”

“It’s not easy to get it exactly right, but it can be done,” she added.

Explaining that people can be very sensitive and some don’t seem to have much of a sense of humor, and thus, satire is definitely not for everyone, the mother of three went on to confirm that she is still “very much in favor” of the medium as a social commentary. “I’m all for it, totally—unless it ever tries to dip its toe into my sacred pond of personal beliefs. If that happens, it’s crossed a line from profitable to destructive, and at that point it needs to be silenced immediately.”

That line between “profitable” and “destructive” is a fine one, she says, but from years of reading, considering, and digesting satirical content in various formats, Maxwell has become an expert at telling the difference.

“Satire has to be pointed in the right direction—away from my own ideologies and concepts of the world and its workings, where it should land squarely on worldviews adopted by other people,” Maxwell expounded. “Even the people writing it, they should critique their own beliefs and opinions. It’s a good practice for self-awareness, which is sorely lacking in most people. But if they were to, say, suggest that something I hold dear should be held under a bright light—nope, I won’t stand for that. That’s unloving and mean-spirited, and believe you me, they’re going to hear about it.”